publication

Japanese House Reinvented,
Thames and Hudson Ltd, UK, 2015

English

[house-T]
ISBN-10: 050034308X, ISBN-13: 978-0500343081



2A Magazine #33&34,
2A Magazine, Istanbul, 2016

English

[pont mutin, esprit-N]
ISSN 1735-5192



IDA Book 2014,
International Design Awards, America, 2016

English

[pont mutin]



wՂ̐E}x
- A Bird's-eye View of World -,
Lsp, Japan, 2015

Japanese

[LaLO͌^ ]
ISBN 9784939105388



Jutaku: Japanese Houses,
Phaidon, United Kingdom, 2015, p.469

English

[house-T]
ISBN 9780714869629



JAPANESE CONTEMPORARY HOUSE,
- Small Anthology of floating spaces -
,
Alice Sordelli and Elena Zanoni, Lettera Ventidue Edizioni S.r.l., Italy, 2015

English, Italian
ISBN 9788862421591

[house-T]

This house is a white and abstract monolith that creates a stark contrast with the adjacent buildings. The house was separated from the city to protect it from the noisiness of the street along the site and from the buildings that surround it in the neighborhood.
A narrow cut on side of the main elevation creates an interruption in the block (and creates its entrance) and a passage that leads directly into the dining room. In plan, the development conceptually evokes a labyrinth, although the layout is quite straightforward and its introverted character guarantees the required privacy. The rooms on the two levels are quite similar to each other and look out onto small courtyard that receives light from above and creates a diaphragm between the street and the interior.

Questa abitazione è un bianco ed astratto monolite che contrasta decisamente con gli edifici circostanti. La scelta di una chiusura verso la città deriva dalla rumorosità della strada che affianca il lotto e dagli edifici che si trovano nel quartiere.
Uno stretto taglio all'estremità della facciata principale segna un'interruzione nel blocco-volume (l'ingresso) e attraverso un corridoio conduce direttamente nella sala da pranzo. Lo sviluppo in pianta rimanda concettualmente ad un labirinto, ma in realtà la disposizione degli ambienti è molto semplice e la loro introspezione garantisce la privacy degli abitanti. Le stanze dei due piani, molto simili fra loro, affacciano su un piccolo cortile interno, che riceve luce dall'alto e si interpone fra la strada e l'interno.




IDA Book 2013,
International Design Awards, America, 2015

English

[esprit-N]



wettbewerbe journal,
wettbewerbe, Germany, 2014.6, vol.317, p.32

German

[Daylight Spaces 2014]

Die Entfaltung hoher architektonischer Qualität auf engstem Raum durch die Nutzung von Tageslicht ist das wesentliche Merkmal des Projektes Hause T von Michiya Tsukano aus Japan. Die geometrische Komposition des Gebäudes erlaubt einerseits die natürliche Raumbelichtung, die ausnahmslos von oben erfolgt, andererseits schafft sie großzügig anmütende räumliche Zusammenhänge und Außenraumbezüge. Die Innenräume erfahren dadurch eine entscheidende Aufwertung. Die gezielte Auswahl der eingesetzten Materialien bestimmen die Lichtfarben in den Innenund Außenbereichen und ermöglichen so eine subtile räumliche Strukturierung.




Architecture of Israel Quartley (ai),
Architecture of Israel Quartley, Israel, 2014, vol.96, pp.62-65

English, Hebrew

[Project of the Year International Competition 2013-2014]



Extreme Minimalism,
Braun Publishing, Switzerland, 2014, pp.116-119

English
ISBN 978-3-03768-164-0

[house-T]



Ottagono,
Compositori Comunicazione, Italy, vol.265, 2013.11, p.71

English, Italian

[house-T]

The need for privacy and protection from sound pollution in modern cities are two factors underpinning design choices in this home in central Miyazaki. The building seems closed in from the outside, while the interior reverberates with a natural warming light, accentuating harmony in the natural materials. Despite its inhospitable external appearance, an appealing sensory experience resides within, thanks to form simplicity and careful pairings of warm and cool materials.




NEXT LANDMARK 2013,
floornature, Italy, 2013, pp.8-9

English

[house-T]



Architects Datafile (ADF),
July, net MAGmedia Ltd, United Kingdom, 2013, p.20

English

[AR House Award 2013]

Grupo Aranea and Tsukano Architect Office are joint winners at the AR House Awards, held at the Royal College of Physicians, Regents Park. Spread across the globe from China to the UK, the winning projects from this yearfs AR House Awards offer compelling new perspectives on the house that extol and extend its essential pioneering spirit.
The jury this year was Amanda Levete (UK), Francisco Aires Mateus (Portugal) and Takaharu Tezuka (Japan). Jury chair and AR Editor Catherine Slessor commented that gThe standard of submissions was extremely high, testifying to the fact that as a building type, the house continues to be the standard bearer of often quite radical innovation that presages deeper evolutionary currents in architecture and societyh.
Now in its fourth year, the AR House Awards exceeded expectations, with a record number of entries competing for an overall prize fund of 10,000. As well as the two joint winners, the jury decided to highly commend 11 further projects. Over 200 of the industryfs elite gathered to celebrate excellence and innovation in the design of a one-off house. During the day the winning and highly commended architects presented their projects at the Pedini showroom.



IDA Book 2012,
International Design Awards, America, 2013

English

[house-T]



wVzZWx,
Vz, 2013.8, p.166

Japanese

[AR House Award 2013]



The Architectural Review (ar),
1397, vol.CCXXXIV, The Architectural Review, United Kingdom, 2013, pp.38-43

English

[house-T]

Allusions to ritual and a spirit of sensuality inform this hermetic house in Japan
By Ken Tadashi Oshima

House-T, joint winner of this yearfs AR House Awards, is a powerfully pure statement of dwelling in the 21st century. The housefs blank white walls stand as a steadfastly silent and self-contained riposte to the banality of the surrounding apartments, ordinary suburban dwellings and roar of traffic in downtown Miyazaki in southern Japan.
At first glance, House-T might appear to be a paradigm of Platonic form. Yet through its abstraction it raises the question of how to empathise with such a volume. Does its Euclidean geometry imply the universality of Modernism? Or in this particular cultural context, does such whiteness and plainness conjure up images of tofu?
Is such a seemingly simple form timeless, or rather incumbent upon time, through the cycles of day and night and seasons, to bring it to life?
As Michiya Tsukanofs first built work, House-T has launched the architectfs career into almost instant stardom as an early masterwork. Since its first appearance six months ago, the house has captured the imagination of the architectural cyber world. Its minimal form exudes both youthful energy and mature restraint | a tension similarly embodied in the landmark works of Tadao Andofs early Row House at Sumiyoshi, with its blank exposed-concrete front facade perforated by a single central door, and Toyo Itofs U-House at Nakano Honcho, with its monolithic, curved concrete wall.
Each is a work by an architect in his thirties that reconsiders the fundamentals of living through the pure statement of an inward-looking, minimal dwelling, and each became signature works of their respective careers.
Like his predecessors, Tsukanofs design turns its back on the chaos of the city to enclose a microcosmic world brought to life by an internal courtyard. All House-Tfs rooms face into the narrow courtyard on its east side, capturing morning light reflected off white gravel. Two stacked floors maintain the same basic plan configuration with living above dining, bedroom above the kitchen, and bathroom above the study.
Notably, the internal ground plane lies around a metre below the courtyard, giving intensified low views of the gravel from the dining ledge and kitchen counter. Even without verdant vegetation, the courtyard animates the living spaces with the primal natural forces of light and wind, reflected and refracted within.
Such an internal world evokes multiple readings. The housefs material expression is a composition of contrasting planes: at ground level, a smooth concrete floor with a timber wall and ceiling, and textured concrete core. The upper level reverses this relationship with a wooden floor and white plaster walls and ceilings.
These spatial compositions appear timeless, yet can also be seen to evoke the work of Japanese Modernist pioneer Sutemi Horiguchi, especially in his Okada House (1933), or of Tsukanofs translation of Le Corbusierfs roof terraces into the Japanese context, a theme of his ongoing research.
Moreover, the internal spaces could be seen to be a modern version of a traditional tea house, inspired by the 16th-century tea master Sen no Rikyu.
Like entering a tea house, the housefs entry sequence is ritualistic, through a dark corridor and down some steps to bring you below ground level, decompressing from the distracting blare of the outside world to a tranquil, internalised environment. Just as the tea ceremony provides solace from chaos, so the interior maintains a sense of calm and intimacy as the basis to perfect everyday life.
The pristine whiteness of Tsukanofs House-T also raises the question of how the dwelling will age over time. And will such radical architecture enhance or constrict the lives of its occupants? The freshness of the timber walls might be seen to resonate with the storehouses of the famous Ise Shrine that are rebuilt every 20 years.
For a brief moment before being torn down, the Ise Shrinefs new iteration is juxtaposed side by side with its predecessor from 20 years earlier, embodying the immemorial cycles of time, growth and decay in a tradition that has continued since the seventh century. House-T, in its current and imagined future states, can also be seen to be timeless and incumbent upon time.
Situated between microcosmic and macrocosmic worlds, House-T thus connects with both the past and future through the rigour of minimal dwelling in all its experienced and imagined multiplicities.



Bauwelt,
1-2.13, Bauwelt, Germany, 2012, p.38

German

[house-T]



SD2012,
oʼn, 2012, pp.8,32-33

Japanese
ISBN 978-4-306-04584-2

[house-ino]